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20 years old. Identifies as queer. Here's some of the shit I'm into.

Not even kidding there are very few times in my life where I have been more scared than I was just then

Update: I have defeated the spider. I will live another day.

I’m going to die this spider is going to kill me I just know it

WELL I just saw a big ol fluffy spider scuffle across my desk so guess who’s not sleeping tonight

amazign:

djprincessk:

stop-hammerkind:

srsfunny:

Glass Blower: Sculpting A Horse From Molten Glass

WHAT

#this bitch just said let there be horse and there was

i thought this was a gif of a man fighting a giant angry slug

amazign:

djprincessk:

stop-hammerkind:

srsfunny:

Glass Blower: Sculpting A Horse From Molten Glass

WHAT

#this bitch just said let there be horse and there was

i thought this was a gif of a man fighting a giant angry slug

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

nosdrinker:

everyone who likes coconut water is lying

fincher1999:

codeinewarrior:

say those three words and i’m yours

robert de niro

shakespeareandpunk:

might i also suggest Matthew Bourne’s Dorian Gray ballet 

WHOA

ifoundoutatzeropoint:

one of my favorite moments from this show

total guilty pleasure

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Hong Chun Zhang

1. My Grandmother’s Cage

The cage represents the patriarchal society that kept women bound to the private space within the home. Grandmother also had bound feet. The practice that crushed the bones and deformed the feet of young girls so they can have the outward appearance tiny delicate feet. The goal was to have a “Three Inch Golden Lotus” (sancun jinlian), but the actual result was unbelievable pain that lasted a lifetime. In this picture, grandmother is sewing a normal size pair of cotton shoes because her daughter was the first women in her family to break the cycle of bound feet.

2. My Mother’s Cage

Unlike my grandmother, the cage door is open. Mother had more freedom as a women in the Communist Chinese society. Her feet were not bound and she had a number of career opportunities. Still, my mother did not have the frredom to say or do what she wanted. Her cage was the restrictions of the day and Maoist Thought, especially during the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). The Chinese character on the cup is (weibing or hongweibing); the Red Guard.

3. My Cage

Compared to my grandmother and my mother’s generations, Chinese society has progressed and the situation for young urban women in China has improved. The cage is open and I can sit on the outside. The Chinese character on the cup is fu meaning good fortune.

Also notice that the feet are uncovered and slightly exaggerated (larger than normal).